Happy Birthday & God Bless the U.S.M.C.

I will begin with a brief history of the U.S. Marines courtesy of http://www.military.com.  I am a proud wife, daughter and friend to several marines who served this country with honor: Barry A. Baker (husband), John K. Gilbertson (dad),  Albert Baker, (Barry’s Paw- Paw) Harold Deibert Sr. and Allen Weinert (friends). All of these great men, who have been in my life, have passed on now. I miss them all, especially my husband and my dad.

On November 10, 1775, the Second Continental Congress meeting in Philadelphia passed a resolution stating that “two Battalions of Marines be raised” for service as landing forces with the fleet. This resolution established the Continental Marines and marked the birth date of the United States Marine Corps.

Serving on land and at sea, these first Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations, including their first amphibious raid into the Bahamas in March 1776, under the command of Capt. (later Maj.) Samuel Nicholas. The first commissioned officer in the Continental Marines, Nicholas remained the senior Marine officer throughout the American Revolution and is considered to be the first Marine Commandant. The Treaty of Paris in April 1783 brought an end to the Revolutionary War and as the last of the Navy‘s ships were sold, the Continental Navy and Marines went out of existence,

Following the Revolutionary War and the formal re-establishment of the Marine Corps on 11 July 1798, Marines saw action in the quasi-war with France, landed in Santo Domingo, and took part in many operations against the Barbary pirates along the “Shores of Tripoli.”

Marines took part in numerous naval operations during the War of 1812, as well as participating in the defense of Washington at Bladensburg, Maryland, and fought alongside Andrew Jackson in the defeat of the British at New Orleans.

The decades following the War of 1812 saw the Marines protecting American interests around the world, in the Caribbean, at the Falkland Islands, Sumatra and off the coast of West Africa, and also close to home in operations against the Seminole Indians in Florida. Marines have participated in all of the following wars of the United States, and in most cases were the first service members to fight. To date, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores.

Today, there are more than 200,000 active-duty and reserve Marines, organized into three divisions stationed at Camp LejeuneCamp Pendleton, and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere on short notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning “Always Faithful” in Latin.

Now, you can see why I have a special love and affection for the Marine Corp. My hometown of Oceanside, CA proudly houses a large part of Camp Pendleton. Unlike many other countries, our military is voluntary, except for a few times in history when there was a draft. May I say, God bless and keep the USA in Your care. God bless all our vets and thank you for your service. Semper Fi and OOO RAH Marines!!!!usmc-flag

 

Something to Think About……

Discrimination in any form, no matter the reason, should not be tolerated. As a person with Cerebral Palsy, the video below hurt me to the core. Far too often, I find that I have to remind myself that it is 2018.  Discrimination hurts! We have not come as far as I thought. I turned 4 years old in late 1968, so I don’t  recall the chaos of the 60’s. But I have read about it, and I have watched some clips about it on TV. It may well have seemed like Hell on earth to many minority groups who had few laws to protect them in those days. Fast forward to today. We have some of the necessary laws, but many people lack humanity and empathy. This couple just wanted something to eat. Additionally, employees need to learn how to treat customers! Treat others nicely, like you wish to be treated!

 

Ableism Should Be Eliminated

Abilism photo

This is a summation of an article that I read for a discussion in school, but it covers my own thoughts and feelings well, so I thought I would share it with my friends and family. I hope you find it worth reading.
About 20% of us have some sort of disability. Therefore, ableism is a construct in our society that we cannot remove too soon. The problem is that it is deeply rooted in our vocabulary and in our subconscious. We need to stop viewing people with disabilities as defective and different (in a negative light). After all, we all have similarities and differences. In other words, we must do away with the idea that we need to be “fixed” and that we have no gift or talent to offer others. The ablest ideal allows us to marginalized, discriminated against and treated as though we have far less value than nondisabled people. (Zellwinger, 2015)
As a society, we often fail to offer full accessibility beyond getting in the front door – wheelchair ramps. After all, are wheelchair ramps, larger restrooms, curb cuts, larger dressing rooms etc. a huge bother for nondisabled people? Other accommodations can also include “braille, seeing-eye dogs/assistant dogs, ergonomic workspaces, easy to grip tools, closed captions … class note-takers, recording devices for lectures” and other services and accommodative devices or equipment. Lack of these restrict our autonomy and make us more dependent on others. Not only that, it takes away from our well-being and self-esteem. We begin to feel like a “burden.” More than that, a person with a disability often does not always have full access to healthcare. How does a person in a wheelchair get on an exam table? How does a nonverbal person communicate their problems and medical needs without a caregiver there? Medical providers need to be more aware of these difficulties (Zellwinger, 2015)
The language of ableism leads to both individual oppression as well as societal oppression as a whole. Inclusion should be the goal. Such pejorative terms include: mentally retarded, moron, high functioning, incapacitated person etc. need to be stricken from society’s vocabulary. I realize that many of these terms are used to describe a condition, or level of a condition, but more work needs to be done to find and use language with a more positive connotation. As I have said previously, I prefer the term “challenged” because a challenge does not have a negative feeling; it is just something to be dealt with or overcome. Finally, it is very important to remember that not disabilities are visible, however, that does not make them any less real.
People with disabilities should have the same rights to housing, employment, medical care, and educational access as anyone else who is considered nondisabled. In other words, they should be treated with respect and humanity individually and referring to them as a group. People with disabilities deserve to lead the best life possible.

Zellwinger, J. (2015) 6 forms of ableism we need to retire immediately Retrieved from
http://mic.com/…/6-forms-of-ableism-we-need-to-retire-immed…

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